Posts Tagged With: Sangiovese

Easy Recipes for Winter – Porcini and Truffles

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This week has been very wintery here on the Southern Highlands with strong winds that drill through your body wrapping their icy fingers around your bones.   This has made me retreat inside to sit in front of the fire with my cookbooks rediscovering some of my favourite recipes for winter. I particularly love to cook with mushrooms at this time of year. The shelves of my local grocer are packed with a myriad of varieties. They are weird and wonderful with their fanciful shapes and colours. Portobello mushrooms are the king of these as they are the size of dinner plates. Seeing them brings back childhood memories of wandering through the paddocks after the rain and picking these for a special dinner.

I think this was the first thing that I cooked with my Mum. She would let me sit with her in the kitchen and peel the skin off the top of the mushroom cap and remove the stalk. These days there is no need to peel mushrooms as they are all clean and respectable but remember these were field mushrooms so there was plenty of cow poo around. Mum would then put a large iron fry-pan on the wood stove and in it would go a huge slab of butter. When that was sizzling she would put in the mushroom and fry them off. Just before she served them she would add some fresh cream, salt and pepper and a handful of very finely chopped parsley. We would enjoy a feast of mushrooms on toast for dinner that night.

Porcini and Mozzarella Pie with Pine Nuts and Truffle

Sformatini di funghi porcini e mozzarella con pinoli

Ingredients

• 300 gms fresh porcini mushrooms (or other favourites)
• 200gms fresh mozzarella cheese (not that horrid hard stuff wrapped in plastic)
• 6 eggs
• 1 clove garlic
• 5 tablespoons cream
• 20 gms butter
• Salt and pepper to taste
Garnish
• 1 handful roasted pine nuts
• Leaf salad
• Fresh truffle
Procedure
1. Preheat oven to 140 degrees C.
2. Clean the fresh mushrooms (do not wash) and chop
3. Melt butter in frying pan and add chopped clove of garlic and fry untill golden
4. Add mushrooms and season with salt and pepper and cook with lid on until tender
5. Cut mozzarella into small cubes
6. Mix eggs, cream and salt in a bowl and add the mozzarella and cooked mushrooms
7. Grease and line the bottom of ramekins with baking paper and spoon mixture into the ramekins
8. Place ramekins in a large baking dish and gently half fill baking dish with cold water
9. Place in the oven and cook for 20 minutes
10. Serve on a bed of salad leaves and garnish with toasted pine nuts and shaved truffles.

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Roasted Veal with Porcini Mushrooms

Arrosto di Vitello con Funghi Porcini

Ingredients

  • 700 gms single piece of veal and flatten with a mallet (not too thin)
  • 200 gms mortadella
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 clove of garlic chopped
  • 2 stems of rosemary
  • Salt and pepper
  • 100gms dry porcini mushrooms
  • 1 Tbs grated parmesan chees
  • Dry white wine
  • Olive oil

Procedure

  1. Preheat the oven to 180 C
  2. Soak the porcini mushrooms in hot water for 10 minutes
  3. Beat the eggs with a pinch of salt, parmesan cheese and 1 Tbs chopped rosemary
  4. Heat a little olive oil in a frying pan and make an omelette – set aside
  5. Drain the porcini (saving the water) and cook in a frying pan with a little olive oil and garlic
  6. Lay the meat on a chopping board and cover with the slices of mortadella, then the omelette and finally the mushrooms
  7. Roll up the veal, place a rosemary sprig on top and tie the meat up with string
  8. Brown meat in a cast iron pan (suitable for the oven as well)
  9. Add the porcini water and white wine
  10. Roast in the oven for about 45 mins to one hour
  11.  Remove the meat and rest
  12.  Reduce the roasting juices and pass through a sieve and serve with the meat

I love to serve this with rosemary and garlic roasted potatoes and spinach Roman style.

Hint:  To stop potatoes sticking to the pan when roasting or sautéing them, place a sheet of baking paper on the bottom of the pan. Guaranteed crunchy potatoes every time!

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Spinach Roman Style

Spinaci alla Romana

This recipe appeared in The Times Magazine in an article by Judith Barrett, who adapted it from “The Food of Southern Italy,” by Carlo Middione.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons of the smallest available raisins, black or golden
  • 4 medium-size bunches of spinach (about 2 ½ pounds), washed at least twice, but not dried, and trimmed of stems
  • 1/3 cup virgin olive oil
  • 5 medium garlic cloves, peeled and well crushed
  • 4 tablespoons pine nuts
  • Big pinch of salt
  • 6 or 7 grindings of fresh black pepper.

Procedure

1. Put the raisins in a small bowl with enough warm water to cover. Soak for about 15 minutes. Set aside.

2. Put the wet spinach in a frying pan large enough to hold it all and cook over a high flame until it collapses and turns dark green, stirring constantly. Transfer the spinach to a colander and set it aside. If the frying pan is wet, dry it with a paper towel.

3. Pour the olive oil into the frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and brown it, being careful it doesn’t burn, and then remove and discard it. Take the raisins from the water, squeeze them as dry as possible and add them to the oil with the pine nuts. Turn the heat to medium and cook until the nuts turn a golden color. Be careful, because the nuts can burn easily.

4. Return the spinach to the pan, stir it with a fork and add salt and pepper to taste. Mix all the ingredients and continue cooking for about a minute. You may add additional olive oil if you think the spinach looks dry. Serves 4.

Categories: Cooking School, Food, Wine and Cooking, Italy, Photography, Recipes, Travel, Uncategorized, Wine | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Olive Oil – The Life Blood of Italy

Last week I met Gabriella, for lunch at a winery on the south coast of NSW not far from the village of Milton and the town of Ulladulla. Cupitt’s Winery sits snuggly on a hillside overlooking a lake and in the distance, the hills rise up to meet the clear blue autumn sky.

Over a delicious lunch and a glass of mulled wine (to keep the autumn chill out of our bones) we reminisced about the time that we’d first met in Italy in October 2012. We were both attending a week-long photographic workshop at the magic destination of Dievole winery in Tuscany.

Dievole is the quintessential Italian experience. The rolling Tuscan hills are covered in olive groves and vineyards where the vines leaves are changing to vibrant reds, oranges and rusts in the crisp autumn weather; quaint hillside towns and villages; cafes where you can sit in the sun sipping strong coffee and let time pass you by; small family-run restaurants serving fresh, local produce such as autumn truffles, freshly picked mushrooms of many shapes and colours, fresh farm cheese and a variety of meat and poultry. Every meal was an excuse to try something new, a specialty of the area prepared by the chef in his/her own style, or that of his/her mother and grandmother and all the generations of cooks before them. Culinary traditions run deep in the Italian kitchen and are held in awe by those behind the stove.

Sunrise over the Vineyards - Tuscany

Sunrise over the Vineyards – Tuscany

We woke early on our first morning to find the valleys shrouded in mist which created an ideal atmospheric “shoot” for our first photographic excursion. During the week we enjoyed many wonderful forays into the countryside, towns and villages snapping away to capture “the moment”.

One excursion I remember most fondly was visiting a nearby farm and oil press. Which was in the midst of its annual harvest and oil production. The owner gave us a tour of the press which was “all systems go” at the time as many local farmers had bought their olive crop in for pressing. At the end of the production line the oil was decanted into a variety of cans, bottles, flasks and any other suitable containers that could be mustered for the occasion.

Olive oil is a staple in Italian cooking and runs in the veins of every Italian. We were treated to the fabulous experience of tasting the year’s production on-site. In the pressing room, there is an open fire-place where crusty bread was toasted over the coals then doused with lashings of rich, peppery olive oil fresh from the press, on top of which were placed generous slices of pancetta and pecorino cheese. This mouth-watering combination was washed down by the vineyard’s red wine.

We stood next to the fire, chatting to the hum and clatter of the machinery as the giant stone wheels whirred around pressing the olives and extracting every last drop of liquid gold.

Categories: Cooking School, Food, Wine and Cooking, Italy, Photography, Recipes, Travel, Uncategorized, Wine | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Italy on a Plate – Pasta and Porcini

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Dievole is an enchanted valley not far from Siena. The name is synonymous with the vineyard that was established here over 1,000 years ago and has since been lovingly cultivated by generations of the families who have made this valley their home.

Today, Dievole is still an enchanted place. I spent ten wonderful days here sampling the wine, relishing great local food and fresh produce, enjoying warm Italian hospitality, and above all, marvelling at the fantastic and beautiful scenery; the lush valleys, the rolling hillsides covered in vines that were adopting their autumn colours of gold and red, the deep green oak forests that are home to wild boar, and the quaint stone-built villages clinging to the hillsides.

What bought me to Dievole was my interest in photography. I came to learn and refine my skills with a fantastic teacher – Chris Corradino from New York. It was a great experience to see Italy with fresh eyes and a different perspective through the camera lens.

Our week flew by with excursions to interesting and different vistas; an urban shoot in Firenze, exploring small villages, nosing around old buildings, capturing open spaces and dawn shoots to get that special light. We were faced with all sorts of technical and artistic challenges along the way which were quickly resolved with Chris’ encouragement. A sample of my photos accompanies this blog.

Dievole has a wonderful gastronomic history. I enjoyed many memorable meals and the opportunity to talk to the chef and waiters who are passionate about serving great food as they are about eating it. A couple of culinary highlights demonstrate the essence of Italian cooking to me – the use of fresh, local produce and letting the flavours of the food speak for themselves. In typical Italian fashion, dishes are not complicated by conflicting tastes, textures and are not swimming in sauces. Plates are simply and beautifully presented where the ingredients are king and not necessarily dominated by the person in the kitchen that put it altogether.

Pasta is a dish that illustrates the Italian food ideal of simplicity. Every locality and region in Italy has its own signature pasta and here in this corner of Tuscany, it is pici, also known as pinci. This is a hand-rolled, eggless thick spaghetti and a good example of “cucina povera” (poor man’s cuisine) — utilizing only flour, water, green Tuscan olive oil. Originating from the Val d’Orcia region (the area between Montalcino and Montepulciano). This pasta is best served with sauces such as: briciole – breadcrumbs, aglione – spicy garlic tomato sauce, boscaiola – porcini mushrooms, and ragù – a meat based sauce, game meat such as – cinghiale – wild boar, leper – hare and anatra – duck.
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Cooking Tip – What is the correct pasta serving size?

Firstly, how much pasta you need to cook depends on a number of factors – whether you are cooking a first course of a main course, the type of pasta you are cooking, and how hungry your guests are.
The general rule is that the amount of pasta to cook per person should be roughly:

•75g-115g/3oz-4oz dried pasta;
•115g-150g/4oz-5oz fresh pasta;
•175g-200g/6oz-7oz filled pasta, such as ravioli ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I have two recipes for you – one a quick and easy dish for a light lunch, and the other, is a heartier meal with complex rich flavours. You won’t be disappointed…

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Pici con Pomodoro e Porcini (serves 4)

Ingredients
• Pici pasta – fresh or dry (amount per the above guide)
• 2 tablespoons cold pressed extra virgin – a must
• 1 punnet ripe! cherry tomatoes
• 2 cloves finely chopped fresh garlic
• 250 mls dry white wine (and a glass for yourself)
• Thinly sliced porcini mushrooms (or others if you can’t find porcini)
• Salt and pepper
• Parmesan cheese

Method
1. Prepare the pasta according to the packet instructions and for the number of serves required
2. When the pasta is just al dente drain and coat with olive oil and keep warm
3. In a frying pan heat the olive oil and toss in chopped garlic and stir for a minute
4. Splash in some white wine and cook off for a minute
5. Toss in washed cherry tomatoes and heat through
6. Toss in the cooked pasta and heat through
7. Season to taste
8. Place on a flat serving plate and arrange the sliced fresh mushrooms on top
9. Offer parmesan cheese and a crusty bread roll.
10. Perfect with a dry white wine – pinot grigio or similar

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Ragu di Anatra (Duck Breast Ragu (serves 4)

Ingredients
• 20g butter
• 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
• 2 duck breasts (3 if small) trimmed of skin and excess fat, thinly sliced into strips
• 6 slices chopped pancetta
• 1 finely chopped onion
• 2 garlic cloves finely chopped
• 1 finely chopped carrot
• 1 finely chopped celery stalk
• 2 bay leaves
• 2 tbsp. tomato paste
• 250ml dry red wine such as Chianti (and of course a glass for you)
• 600g good-quality tomato pasta sauce
• 1 cup (250ml) chicken stock
• Grated parmesan, to serve

Method

1. Heat the butter and oil in a frypan over medium-high heat.
2. Cook the duck, in batches, until browned.
3. Remove duck with a slotted spoon and place in a bowl.
4. Drain all but 1 tablespoon oil from the pan and heat over medium heat.
5. Add pancetta, onion, garlic, carrot, celery and bay leaves to the pan and cook, stirring, for 2-3 minutes until they start to colour.
6. Return the duck to the pan with any resting juices,
7. Add the tomato paste and cook, stirring, for 1 minute.
8. Add the red wine and cook for 2-3 minutes until the liquid has reduced slightly.
9. Add the tomato sauce and chicken stock, bring to a simmer, then reduce heat to low, cover and gently simmer for 45 minutes or until the duck is tender and the sauce has thickened slightly.
10. Season the sauce to taste and serve the ragu with the cooked pici
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Do you know any foodies? Please forward my blog to them and ask them to sign up – more fab recipes to come!

In my next blog I visit the olive oil press for an amazing treat.

Categories: Cooking School, Food, Wine and Cooking, Italy, Language, Photography, Recipes, Travel, Uncategorized, Wine | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Italy on a Plate – Pumpkin and Parmesan Custards – Yummy!!!

Italy has many festivals and “The Festa della Zucca” held in October in a small town Venzone – in the Friuli–Venezia which is Italy’s most North-Eastern region. Venzone is pumpkin central. The town center transforms itself into a Medieval carnival with fire eaters, jugglers and street dancers all parading in the streets which are lit by torches and candles. The locals get into the mood by dressing as nobles, knights and ladies, innkeepers, shopkeepers and merchants. The atmosphere is enhanced as the shops are decorated with pumpkins and gastronomic delights such as pumpkin pizza, pumpkin gnocchi, pumpkin crostini and more. The humble pumpkin is elevated to royal status for the occasion.

The origins of the Pumpkin Festival are legendary. The Noble of the village of Venzone wanted to beautify and fortify the town and used the townsfolk as labourers. On completion of the restoration, the workers were not rewarded including a special craftsman who was to decorate the copper dome of the Cathedral of Venzone with a golden ball. But he too was not paid for his work so he craftily replaced the ball on the golden dome of the cathedral with a pumpkin. The Noble realized that he was tricked by the artist only on the day when the ball fell from its position on the dome and smashed to the ground.

Recently I had 8 friends for lunch and like every cook, planning the meal is half the fun. Poring over the cook books, being inspired by far a way places and cuisines and salivating over sumptuous and mouth-watering food photos. However, this time I decided to cook lunch using some of the recipes that I received at the Casa Ombuto cooking school in Tuscany last year. You can read more about this in my other blogs.

The lunch menu was:
Antipasto – Filo Cups filled with Aubergine Sauce (salsa con melanzane)
Prima Piatti – Pumpkin and Parmesan custards (Copette di zucca e parmigiano)
Secondo Piatti – “Jump in the Mouth” Veal with Sage and Ham (saltimbocca alla romana)
Dolce – Tiramasu (this literally means “pick you up”

The Pumpkin and Parmesan Custards were real winners as they were a new taste sensation and a different approach to serving pumpkin. The result is a lovely creamy custard that is slightly sweet from the pumpkin and the complex hint of the smoked cheese. I think the smokier the cheese the better.

So here is the recipe for you to try….
Ingredients
• 350 gms of cooked and pureed pumpkin
• 320 ml pouring cream
• 2 eggs
• 1 tablespoon grated smoked cheese (I used smoked cheddar)
• 50 gms grated parmesan cheese
• Salt and pepper to taste

Method

1. Preheat oven to 150 degrees
2. Pass cooked and pureed pumpkin through a sieve
3. Mix pumpkin, cream and smoked cheese and salt and pepper until smooth
4. Add the eggs and mix well
5. Pour into individual heat proof ramekins
6. Bake in a “bagno maria” (a water bath) for about 45 minutes or until the cream has thickened when you give it a gentle shake
7. Take out of oven and sprinkle about a teaspoon of grated parmesan cheese on top of each custard
8. Place under a hot grill until the cheese is golden brown
9. Serve warm with some crusty bread and a full-bodied white wine – maybe a pinot grigio from Fruili.

Happy cooking and eating… do you have any other favourite Italian dishes that you would like the recipe for? Just drop me a line in the comment box below.

For information, prices and dates for cooking schools in Tuscany please contact me at varley.e@gmail.com

Categories: Cooking School, Food, Wine and Cooking, Italy, Language, Photography, Recipes, Travel, Uncategorized, Wine | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Italy On A Plate – Il Ragu, The Best Bolognese Sauce Recipe Ever!

In Australia, like the rest of the world we eat Bolognese sauce by the litres. Commonly known as “Spag Bol” – this dish is to be found on menus everywhere, and in every instance, there is a variation made by the chef. Sometimes this is successful, but in most instances, these Bolognese sauces bear little resemblance to anything that you will find in Italy.

However, recently I attended an Italian cooking school in Tuscany, and Paola our chef says this is the “real McCoy”. Bolognese sauce is an Italian meat-based sauce for pasta which originated in Bologna, a city in Northern Italy. There it is often referred to as Il Ragu. It is a rich, thick and hearty sauce that unctuously clings to the pasta. Italians do not eat pasta swimming in sauce but prefer a “drier” sauce that has bold and clear flavours and is equal partner to the pasta.

Bolognese is a complex sauce which involves long slow cooking to let the flavours develop and intensify. This is not a dish for people in a hurry or the impatient. It is based on a soffritto which uses finely diced onion, carrot, and celery which are sautéed in olive oil until the mixture reaches a state of browning appropriate to its intended use. A soffritto is a building block to many Italian sauces and dishes.

Ingredients
• 1 Medium Red (Spanish) onion
• 2 cloves garlic
• I small carrot
• I stalk celery
• 100gms minced pork
• 200gms minced beef
• 400gms peeled canned tomatoes (crushed or chopped)
• 2 tablespoons of torn basil leaves
• Olive oil
• Salt and pepper
• 2 glasses red wine
• 1 glass of red wine extra
Proceedure
1. Mince the onion, carrot and celery in a food processor or chop very finely by hand
2. Brown these with the olive oil in a large pan over medium heat and season with salt and pepper
3. Add the combined meat and brown well
4. When the meat starts to stick to the pan add half a glass of red wine and leave on low/medium heat to reduce again
5. Repeat this 3 times, each time adding wine, stirring and leaving it to reduce
6. Mash tomatoes (if whole) and pour over to meat mixture and leave to slowly infuse with the meat for 10 minutes and then mix
7. Stir in basil leaves
8. Cover and simmer for 2 hours
9. Stir occasionally and add extra hot water if necessary
10. While il ragu is cooking drink the extra glass of wine!

To serve – use any type of pasta that you prefer, but tagliatelle is the Italian choice. In the absence of tagliatelle, you can also use other broad, flat pasta shapes, such as pappardelle or fettuccine, or with short tube shapes, such as rigatoni or penne.

Offer freshly grated parmesan cheese and a hearty red wine such as Shiraz or a Sangiovese.

Do you have any favourite Italian dishes that you would like the recipe for? Yes? Please just leave a comment below and I will blog that recipe for you….

Recipe with thanks from http://www.tuscookany.com

Categories: Cooking School, Food, Wine and Cooking, Italy, Language, Photography, Recipes, Travel, Uncategorized, Wine | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Tasting Tuscany – Wine, Cheese, and Olive Oil

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During the week at Casa Ombuto we took a break from the cooking classes and spent a day on excursion to some local culinary points of interest.

Our first stop was Villa La Ripa on the Chianti slopes of Arezzo, in Tuscany. The Villa La Ripa, is a beautiful Renaissance villa and is surrounded by a small vineyard of around 15 acres of Sangiovese, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Shiraz vines.
The Villa sits atop a hill where an impressive avenue of cypress trees lead up to the plateau on which the Villa sits and commanding a view of the surrounding area. It is built in the typical Renaissance style – an impressive solid three-storey building with large windows symmetrically placed on its front façade. It is a mellow creamy yellow colour with its original stucco still looking crisp after three centuries.

The first owner was Marco Peconio (2nd century a.d.). His name came from Pacho, the Etruscan god of wine, best known with the Latin name of Bacchus. After a century, the property passed to the Ricoveri Family who raised a fortified building with attached tower, still visible nowadays.

The current shape of the villa can be traced to the Gualtieri Family, an important lineage of poets, cardinals and wine-growers who acquired it in the Renaissance and registered it in the Order of Saint Stephen’s name. In the nineteenth century, after Napoleon’s troops invaded Arezzo, the villa was sequestered and put up for sale by auction. Then the Ubertini family acquired it. They were a noble Aretine family whose most famous member was Guglielmo degli Ubertini, the leader of Aretine soldiers in the great battle against Florence: Campaldino.

At the beginning of the last century the property passed to the Bucchi family who further developed olive-groves and vine growing. They planted the oldest vineyard which is still in the estate. Then it is the turn of the current owners – the Luzzi Family.

Interestingly, the current owner, a local neurosurgeon, bought the Villa without any knowledge of wine making and had intended to pull out the vines. One day a patient, an elderly gentleman who was complaining of headaches, who during the consultation, asked the Doctor what his intention was to do with the vineyard. When the Doctor said that he intended to pull out the vines, the man looked horrified and said that he was a winemaker and offered his services free of charge for a year. The Doctor agreed. Luckily in the first year, and with the old man’s expert advice and direction, the crop yielded some good quality grapes and the first vintage proved to be successful so the vines were saved from ruin. After the initial success, the Doctor was hooked – a new wine maker was born. He now juggles a busy medical practice and wine making.

The Doctor wants to maintain the local traditional of wine-growing and wine-producing, aiming at wine quality. He produces a limited vintage each year and has had success at the London Wine Show winning Silver Medals. Locally in Italy, the wine is competing head to head with some of the well-known market brands. His passion for wine making and his beautiful villa made the visit a great success.

The next stop was to an old olive oil press where we saw the giant stone wheels that grind the olives into a paste. This oily paste is then spread onto large circular fibrous mats and layered like a sandwich on a giant press. As the weight of the press bears down on the pile of mats and paste the liquid from the olives is extracted and sent into a pit where the oil is skimmed off from the water. This rich luscious extraction is cold pressed virgin olive oil and the only oil that you will find in any Italian kitchen and on all Italian dining tables.

We then moved out to the courtyard and sat around a table in the shade of a massive chestnut tree. We tasted the fruits of his labours: the “must” of the olives before the virgin olive oil is skimmed off, virgin olive oil, a variety of oils flavoured with lemon, truffle, chilli, basil, rosemary and a selection of truffle pastes and olive paste. Lunch was then served by his mum: farfalle pasta simply dressed with fresh tomatoes and olive oil, an antipasto plate of: salami, cheese, crostini with olive paste and truffle paste served with a fresh tomato and mozzarella cheese salad. For afters, she had baked some tiny plums which she split in half and dropped a spoonful of plum jam in the centre with a fresh home-made cookie on the side. This was accompanied by plenty of his home made wine.

Everyone felt very mellow after lunch, but we pressed on to meet a local cheese maker. Incongruously he hailed from Wisconsin in the USA and had arrived in Italy some 20 years before on a holiday and has never left since.
He has a herd of 65 milking goats that are his pride and joy. He produces a fresh goat’s ricotta and a variety of soft and hard cultured cheeses. His daily routine is up for milking at 5.00am and then commences the cheese making and then the goats are taken out to graze in the nearby pastures. The variety of feed and climatic conditions dictate the fat content in the in the milk and then the type and quality of cheese that he is able to make.

He told us that the goats are a very jealous lot of girls and when he is out with them in the pastures and has a lie down and a nap they will jostle about to see who can get the closest to him. They never stray far away and are responsive to his call and are very demonstrative in their affection and will nibble his fingers and ears. It seems that he has his hands full with a harem of 65 jealous goats.

The week flew by in a haze of cooking, eating and wine and then it was time to go. So I loaded up the Panda and we hit the trail back to Florence, which was not without incident…

Thank goodness that I left early from the cooking school to allow plenty of time for the return journey. All went well until I reached the suburbs of Florence and the sat nav went a bit haywire (or was it me?). I went around one particular round about 5 times approaching it from different directions before the sat nav and I were in accord. Then the wheels really fell off, when the bloody thing sent me along the Arno river on the wrong side beside the Pitti Palace (which I passed twice!) and wanted me to cross the Arno over the Ponte Vecchio. If you have visited Florence you will know that the Ponte Vecchio is a bridge teeming with pedestrians 24 hours a day. I ended up in amongst the throngs of tourists coming off the bridge and in a maze of dead ends, narrow lanes, and one-way alleys with right angle bends that required a certain amount of manoeuvring.

Meanwhile, two Carabinieri were leaning on their car (looking decidedly glamorous in their uniforms) watching me do a number of illegal U turns, backing up one way streets and generally running amok amongst the tourists. However they did not stir themselves into action, as I am sure that lost motorists doing battle with sat navs is a common sight for these gents.
Finally, I took matters into my own hands, turned the sat nav off and backtracked and crossed over the Arno further downstream from the tourist area. I then programmed the sat nav to find the Santa Maria Novella station as I knew this was in the vicinity of the car rental office. At last success – I arrived after spending 2.5 hours on the road and an hour of that fighting with the sat nav in Florence going around in ever decreasing circles. Boy was I glad to get on the train.

Categories: Cooking School, Food, Wine and Cooking, Italy, Photography, Recipes, Travel, Uncategorized, Wine | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

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