Posts Tagged With: Painting

“Ordinary Objects” Exhibition of Art Works by Elizabeth Varley

Grapes Cheese and Pears On Linen - $350 - 75cm x 50cm

Grapes Cheese and Pears On Linen – $350 – 75cm x 50cm

Solo Exhibition of Art Works by Elizabeth Varley  

“Ordinary Objects”

“In the right light, at the right time, everything is extraordinary”.  ~Aaron Rose

You are invited to the Exhibition Opening : Saturday 10th September 2016, at 2.00pm

The CTC Robertson, 58 Hoddle Street, Robertson NSW 2577  Viewing and sales: August and September 2016

 Hours:  Thursday to Friday 10am – 4pm,  Saturday – 10am -1pm

Visit my Page for all the images – pricing, dimensions and more information

Categories: Art, Cooking School, Food, Wine and Cooking, Italy, Mushrooms, Photography, Recipes, Travel, Uncategorized, Wine | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

From Pampered Pooches to Sponge Cakes

Greetings from the Southern Highlands. The leaves are now turning on their magnificent autumn display. I am amazed at the intensity and vibrancy of the colours – bright yellow through to the deepest red and every hue of rust in between. I almost drove off the road as I was too busy admiring the beautiful scenes in Kangaloon. Isn’t that a great name! Almost as good as where I live – Burrawang! Anyway, as I was reminiscing, time has certainly flown this year and it is already May.

One of the cultural highlights of the year so far was the Robertson Agricultural Show. This is certainly a red letter day on the local calendar. As usual, it rained. It is always great fun to visit a country show and tromp about in the mud carefully dodging cow pats and puddles.

The day started with a visit to the poultry pavilion with its fine feathered specimens. All the exhibits were crowing, cackling and quacking in unison. What a marvelous cacophony.

The dog judging arena is a must see. I am amused by the handlers let alone the dogs. The canines are primped and coiffed to perfection. They are certainly prissier than any blonde going out on a Saturday night date – as the saying goes “the bigger the hair, the closer to God”. The amount of hairspray and blow-drying that these pampered pooches endure is beyond the pale. Why is it that dog people grow to look like their dog?

In the main show pavilion one can enjoy a display of assorted local arts and crafts but the big ticket is the cakes and preserves. The local ladies are stiff competition but I am not daunted as next year I am going to enter my sponge cake so stand by for a big announcement of my winning entry in 2015.

My particular favourite is the children’s vegetable modelling. I had no idea that 5 potatoes of varying sizes and a number of toothpicks could be sculpted into a horse. What imagination!

A trip to the show is always topped off by the sight of handsome cattle, fine looking horses and men wandering around in big hats.

The lead up to the show always has the village abuzz. Our local butcher, Darryl is a very civic minded chap and he creates the Robertson Show in miniature outside his butcher shop for all the locals to enjoy. All the children in the village bring their toy tractors, trucks, cars and a variety animals with which Daryl works his magic. He creates a fabulous miniature show with various events including the now famous potato sack carrying competition. The sight of Barbie crowned as Miss Robertson Showgirl is a hoot. Well done Darryl.

I am looking forward to next year’s Robertson Show. There is nothing like a country show to bring out the community spirit.

Categories: Cake, Dog, Food, Wine and Cooking, Photography, Recipes, Travel, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Queen Who Became a King

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This is remarkable story of a Queen who became a King is quite unique, even in the amazing and fanaciful world of ancient Egypt. Queen Hatshepsut meaning “Foremost of Noble Ladies” (1508–1458 BC) and is generally regarded by Egyptologists as one of the most successful pharaohs, reigning longer than any other woman of an indigenous Egyptian dynasty. Women had a high status in ancient Egypt and enjoyed the legal right to own, inherit, or will property however; a woman becoming pharaoh was rare. Hatshepsut had been well trained in her duties as the daughter of a pharaoh. During her father’s reign she held the powerful office of “God’s Wife” a term often allocated to royal women.

Her accomplishments were many including a number of expeditions to other counties such as Ethiopia and Somalia. She directed many construction projects in her reign, possibly more than any other previous Middle Kingdom pharaohs. She was often depicted as a man waring a false beard, or in the guise of a lion with a human face and wearing a false beard. She was referred to by both male and female pronouns depending on the situation but was regarded politically as an “honorary man.” She married her half brother when she was around 12. He died young and she assumed the role of regent for her infant stepson. She ruled for 21 years when Egypt was a powerhouse in the region and enjoyed an extended period of peace and prosperity. Her legacy was almost lost to history, because on her death, her stepson undertook to obliterate any trace of her reign.

As soon as a pharaoh ascended to the throne work commenced on his burial tomb. The longer the King’s reign, the grander the tomb became in its decoration and the size. A walk through the Valley of the Kings, and to a lesser scale the Valley of the Queens, reinforced the importance that the Kings and Queens placed on preparing themselves for the next life. For a period of nearly 500 years from the 16th to 11th century BC, tombs were constructed for the Pharaohs and powerful nobles of the New Kingdom (the Eighteenth to the Twentieth Dynasties of Ancient Egypt). The valley is known to contain 63 tombs and chambers (ranging in size from KV54, a simple pit, to KV5, a complex tomb with over 120 chambers). The Valley of the Kings was the principal burial place of the major royal figures of the Egyptian New Kingdom, together with those of a number of privileged nobles. The royal tombs are decorated with scenes from Egyptian mythology and give clues to the beliefs and funerary rituals of the period. Almost all of the tombs seem to have been opened and robbed in antiquity, but they still give an idea of the opulence and power of the Pharaohs.

I visited the treasures of Tutankhamen in the Cairo Museum which was amazing in its fantastic opulence. He reigned for only a short period so his tomb was a relatively small size in comparison to others. I can only imagine the wealth and splendor that was inside the larger burial chambers and tombs of Pharaohs whose reigns were significantly longer and more powerful than the boy king.

On November 4th 1922, Egyptologist Howard Carter discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun, the most complete and well-preserved tomb of any of the ancient Egyptian pharaohs This is what Howard Carter said on making the discovery “…as my eyes grew accustomed to the light, details of the room within emerged slowly from the mist, strange animals, statues, and gold – everywhere the glint of gold. For the moment – an eternity it must have seemed to the others standing by – I was struck dumb with amazement, and when Lord Carnarvon, unable to stand the suspense any longer, inquired anxiously, ‘Can you see anything?’ it was all I could do to get out the words, ‘Yes, wonderful things.”

Here are some interesting details about the boy king who has fascinated people since the discovery of his tomb.
• Tutankhamun was only eight or nine when he became ruler of Eygpt.
• Tutankhamun was only King for about ten years before dying in his late teens. It was estimated that he ruled from 1333 BC to 1324 BC.
• Over the years, scientists have used available technology to determine the cause of Tutankhamun’s death. The two most popular theories about his death are that he suffered a blow to the back of the head, either accidentally or deliberately (in other words, murder), or that he broke or fractured his leg which became infected – an infection that led to his death possibly only days later.
• Tutankhamun may have married one of his step-sisters. It is thought that Tutankhamun’s father was Akhenaten. Akhenaten was married to Nefertiti, who bore him six daughters. Akhenaten also had a lesser wife, Kira, who is believed to have given birth to Tutankhamun. It is thought that Tutankhamun married Ankhesenpaaten, one of the daughters of Akhenaten and Nefertiti. Confused?
• Tutankhamun’s remains are still contained in his tomb in the Valley of the Kings at Luxor, Egypt.
• His famous burial mask is on public display in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. The famous gold mask that rested on the pharoahs mummy weighs ten kilos (22 lbs) and is made of gold.
• Cat scans on Tutankhamun’s body in 2005 revealed that the King was about 5 foot, 8 inches tall (180 cm). He was of slight build but was well nourished.
• Approximately 3500 artifacts were found in King Tut’s tomb. It was the first, and to this day the only, royal tomb in the history of Egyptology to be found practically untouched.

The final jaw dropping Egyption experience came at the Great Temple of Ramses (c.1290-1224 BCE) in Abu Simbel. This amazing edifice is carved out of the actual mountain side and is about 38 meters long and 31 meters high. The temple is dedicated to the most important gods of the New Kingdom, Ptah (the creator god of Memphis), Amun-Re (the great god of Thebes) and Re-Harakhte (sun god of Heliopolis), as well as to the Pharaoh, Ramses II himself, whose reign may have lasted 67 years.

The four colossi, including statues of Ramses II, are more than 20 meters high and about 4 meters from ear to ear. They sit impassively guarding the entrance to the temple staring out over Lake Nasser. Their faces are expressionless, giving no trace of the amazing engineering feat that was undertaken to save them and the temple from the rising waters of the new dam.

They and the temple, were carved up into small blocks, carried to higher ground and then reassembled above the high-water mark. Not only were the statues and temple moved but the engineers carved up the mountain that they were carved from and moved it too with the temple inside.

These temples, sat close to the Nile and were probably once brightly coloured and cut into the natural rock. After eleven centuries of oblivion, these temples were rediscovered in 1813 when Johann Ludwig Burckhardt saw by accident the upper parts of the colossal figures. In 1817 Giovanni Battista Belzoni found the entrance, partially freed from the sand. In the following years these temples were often partially covered by shifting sand.

Today, visitors see the reconstructed temples now relocated on higher ground (60 meters directly above their earlier position) after the heroic international rescue efforts to save these treasures from the damming of the Nile and the creation of Lake Nasser. Unlike visitors of the past to Egypt, today’s visitors must adhere to a strict code of conduct including no photography inside the tombs and chambers, or touching of the relics. I was amused to see that many great monuments in Egypt have fallen foul to graffitists. Not today’s baggy jeans and skateboard riding “street artists”, but wealthy well-bred and young noble-men of independent means, making the Grand Tour in the 1800s. On discovering these ancient edifices, many took this as an opportunity to carve their names and dates of their visits into the statue, column or obelisk etc.

Did you enjoy my trip to Egypt? Please leave a comment below…

Next blog – Petra Jordan – A Wonder of the Ancient World

Categories: Egypt, Language, Photography, Travel, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

St Petersburg – Caviar, Vodka and Canals

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After a few days of smooth sailing I am settling into life onboard, my home for the next two weeks. We arrived in St Petersburg, Russia’s gilded “Window to the West” planned by Peter the Great as a progressive city the equal of any in Europe. This grand city is located on the Neva River at the head of the Gulf of Finland on the Baltic Sea. The city was founded by Tsar Peter the Great in 1703. From 1713 to 1728 and from 1732 to 1918, Saint Petersburg was the Imperial capital of Russia. The city was built by conscripted peasants from all over Russia plus a number of Swedish prisoners of war. Tens of thousands of serfs died during the building of the city.

In 1918 the central government bodies moved from St Petersburg (then named Petrograd) to Moscow. It is Russia’s second largest city after Moscow, with almost 5 million inhabitants. In 1924 the name of the city was changed to Leningrad and in 1991 back to St Petersburg.

What a surprise this city is! On this beautiful warm and sunny morning (one of the only 40 sunny days they get here), I was delighted and surprised as to what lay before me. This city is a confection of 17th and 18th century neoclassical/empire style buildings. The large and impressive buildings and palaces that line the streets and canals are typically 3 – 5 stories high with large symmetrical windows and doorways. They are decorated with Greek style pediments and columns, iron railings and iron lace around the overhead balconies, many overflowing with baskets of flowers. The impressive palaces are vast and are identified by the gold crests over their doorways. Painted in soft pastels of cream, yellow, blue, ochre, and white they make this vista a restful and a pleasing palate to the eye. The grand civic buildings are vast and utilise impressive architectural details such as massive columns, rich ornamentation, large soaring staircase leading to gigantic doorways guarded by an array of sculptures standing guard. The most decorative are the Russian Orthodox churches with facades decorated with assorted colourful mosaics, intricately carved wood work, fancy stone and brick work and the gilded “onion” domes gleam in the sunshine.

The most impressive of all the buildings and palaces is The Hermitage. This is the oldest museum in the world, founded in 1764 by Catherine the Great wife of Peter 3rd (who was assassinated in 1762, supposedly in a conspiracy led by Catherine) and has been open to the public since 1852. The collections occupy a large complex of six historic buildings along Palace Embankment, including the Winter Palace, a former residence of the Russian emperors.

Catherine was said to have been a prodigious lover and a woman with a large sexual appetite and numerous lovers – they say numbering in the hundreds. She died in her mid-sixties (probably from exhaustion) and at that time had a lover in his mid-thirties. What a “cougar!” -to borrow an American expression.

In her lifetime Catherine acquired 4,000 paintings including old masters, 38,000 books, 10,000 engraved gems, 10,000 drawings, 16,000 coins and medals and a natural history collection filling two galleries.

The Russian Revolution of 1917 began in Saint Petersburg when the Bolsheviks stormed the Winter Palace. In March 1917, Nicholas II abdicated both for himself and on behalf of his son, thus putting an end to the Russian monarchy. Immediately after the Revolution of 1917, the Imperial Hermitage and Winter Palace, were proclaimed state museums and eventually merged. The range of the Hermitage’s exhibits was further expanded when private art collections from several palaces of the Russian Tsars and numerous private mansions were nationalized and then redistributed among major Soviet state museums. Particularly notable was the influx of old masters from the Catherine Palace, the Alexander Palace, the Stroganov Palace and the Yusupov Palace as well as from other palaces of Saint Petersburg and suburbs.

In 1928, the Soviet government ordered the Hermitage to compile a list of valuable works of art for export. In 1930-1934, over two thousand works of art from the Hermitage collection were clandestinely sold by the communist regime, at auctions abroad or directly to foreign officials and business people. The proceeds no doubt found their way to the pockets of the Communist Party Leaders. Who said that high level corruption is only to be found in the decadent West?

Overlooking the huge act of theft on the part of the communists, the collection is vast and extremely impressive, ranging from Egyptian, Greek, Roman and other antiquities, Flemish and Dutch Maters, a vast Italian collection, a large sculpture gallery, a large number of Impressionist paintings and a modern art collection. It is said that if you spent only 1 minute looking at every piece in the collection it would take 7 years of your life.

During World War II, St Petersburg – then Leningrad, was besieged by German forces. The siege lasted 872 days from September 1941 to January 1944. The Siege of Leningrad was one of the longest, most destructive and most lethal sieges of a major city in modern history. It isolated the city from most supplies except those provided through the Road of Life across Lake Ladoga, and more than a million civilians died, mainly from starvation. Many others were eventually evacuated or escaped by themselves, so the city became largely depopulated.

Today, St Petersburg appears to be thriving. There is evidence that the government is spending money on improving the local infrastructure and on the restoration of these wonderful buildings and palaces. It is said that St Petersburg is Vladimir Putin’s favourite city, hence the flow of money to complete these civil works.

There are many tourists about from all corners of the world – on foot, in coaches, and moving along the vast network of canals in open boats. If you have not procured an independent tourist visa prior to arrival, you can only travel about under the supervision and control of a local guide. The need for hard western cash is evident when you visit many of the popular tourist sites, museums, galleries etc you will amazed at the huge numbers of people they let into the buildings and at times you feel like cattle being herded along.

The complete lack of regard and care that many of the priceless works of art are housed in and maintained is astounding. Hordes of people crowding into rooms and galleries – pressing up against art works, open windows allowing smog, humidity and dirt to drift in and settle everywhere, the lack of security which allows naughty children, and adults alike, to touch exhibits, and the crush of humanity in small rooms can be overwhelming.

Here are some Russian tips and facts:
1. Russians don’t usually say “please” or “thank you”
2. There are a lot of police in Russia, most of whom do nothing other than to try to rip you off
3. Russians drink a lot of vodka
4. 10% of the governments income comes from the sale of vodka.
5. Russians do not have a sense of style. If it looks cheap and nasty – they love it
6. The only alcohol-free zones in Russia are McDonalds
7. Young Russians are attractive, fit and lean – older Russians are fat and ugly
8. Russians love to criticize their own country, but will be offended if a foreigner does
9. Russians aren’t politically correct. Go ahead and tell a joke based on ethnicity, appearance, or gender stereotypes; just steer clear of jokes about somebody’s mother or father. You won’t be understood
10. Russians never shake hands over a door way, they believe it leads to arguments

I would like to give you a challenge… Not Russian Roulette but can you make a Russian immigration official smile? These people have a the countenance of a head from Easter Island, impassive, blank and bloodless. Give it a go – I dare you!

Please leave a comment below – do you have any interesting Russian tips or facts?

Categories: Food, Wine and Cooking, Language, Photography, St Petersburg, Travel, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Italy – Painting Under The Italian Sun

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Borgo San Fedele is a little slice of heaven in the Chianti hills close to the small town of Radda in Chianti and only a 15 minute drive to the wonderful Medieval city of Siena.

However – heaven can be a noisy place during the wild boar-hunting season. The quiet is punctuated with the sound of gun shots and the baying of dogs on the scent of cinghiale (wild boar). Hunting is a weekend recreation as the hunters scour the hillsides for these elusive beasts. They are certainly not a pretty sight face-to-face (the boar that is, not the hunters) – dark, bristly and with sizeable tusks. However, on a plate they are a very appealing and yummy meal – made into a rich stew with homemade pasta, in sausages, salami, dried and served in all sorts of ways this is a local delicacy.

Here is a recipe for you to try when you next get a wild boar in your garden…

PAPPARDELLE WITH WILD BOAR RAGU
Ingredients
• 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
• 500gms cubed wild boar,(substitute pork shoulder)
• 1 teaspoon fine salt
• 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
• 2 tablespoon diced onions
• 1 tablespoon diced carrots
• 1 tablespoon diced celery
• 1/2 tablespoon minced garlic
• 2 tablespoon tomato paste
• 1 tablespoon plain flour
• 1 bottle red wine
• 1 bay leaf
• 1 sprig rosemary
• 1 sprig thyme
• 1 sprig sage
• fresh or dry pasta, cooked al dente (for 4 to 6 serves)

Directions
Heat the oil in a large saucepan over high heat. Season the meat with salt and pepper and add to the pan. Once the meat is browned, add the onions, carrots, celery, and garlic. Reduce the heat and cook until the moisture is gone. Add the tomato paste and flour. Add the red wine and herbs. Cover and cook for about 2 hours or more depending how tender the meat is), stirring occasionally. The sauce is done when the meat is fork tender.
Remove the meat from the sauce and set aside. Strain the sauce, blend, and return to the pan. Pull the meat apart and add back to the blended sauce.

Serve over pasta and a generous dusting of parmesan cheese. Eat with a bottle of full-bodied red wine and crusty bread to mop up the sauce.

Borgo San Fedele, our home for the week, is a marvelous story of discovery and rescue from near ruin. It was a thriving monastic community which was built in the 12th century but in 1982, after a gradual decline, the last priest in residence died and San Fedele was abandoned. Like many abandoned monasteries and convents all over Italy, San Fedele fell on hard times and neglect and nature took over. This saw the wonderful stone buildings fall into decay as roofs collapsed and walls gave way under the pressure of encroaching vegetation.

The current owners – Nicolo and Renata happened on this derelict site and fell in love with the notion of rescuing this wonderful piece of local history and bringing it back to life. It is now a place where individuals and groups can come and experience Renata’s and Nicolo’s hospitality and enjoy a unique place steeped in history and surrounded by the lovely Chianti countryside.

I came to San Fedele to attend a week-long water-colour painting workshop. On the first day, our instructor Pat Fiorello was very encouraging and explained that… “painting requires your full self – the left and right brain, the eyes, hands, heart and soul. The technique of painting, the technical aspect of putting paint on paper involves a motor skill (eye/hand coordination) that I truly believe anyone can learn, but that is just the beginning. There is also the emotional expression, the artist’s personal vision, selection of subject, colors, shapes, etc and the intuition and sometimes magic that goes into creating a piece of art. So to think of it as mechanical – doesn’t really do it justice, it is so much more. And I do believe every one can learn and share their own expression”.

With Pat’s careful and positive encouragement, I am hopeful that I can bring all these aspects together to achieve some level of success. However, talent might have some small part to play. As the days unfold, I am amazed that the paint on paper is taking shape, and amazingly enough, it appears that the subject is somewhat recognizable. Thanks Pat!

During the week we explore the local area and visit a number of very quaint hillside towns including Radda in Chianti, Castelino, Pienza and of course Siena.

This wonderful medieval town which has the amazing and famous shell-shaped Piazza del Campo where the colourful Palio (horse race) is run twice a year in summer. Siena is divided into 17 ‘contrade’, that means ‘little boroughs’, which have their own traditions and colours. They are fierce rivals, and the Palio is an event where this rivaly is played out to the enjoyment of the boisterous and partisan crowd. The race is run in the piazza and the riders ride bareback and grip on for dear life as their horses tear around the square.

There was no horse race there on the day we visited but there were plenty of tourists. This is a great opportunity for a spot of people watching at any one of the cafes and bars that surround the piazza. Sitting there in the warm autumn sun, drinking an espresso (or a wine) and watching the passing parade is a real Italian pastime. As one of the ancient cities of Italy, it is a small city with winding lanes and small alleys, so a good map and a sence of direction are needed to navigate this labarynth.

The day passes quickly with a visit to the Duomo – a magnificent structure, striking in its black and white external façade which is adorned with sculptures. The towers, turrets and spires are all richly decorated. The present building was begun in the early 13 Century and the cupola was finished in 1464. The dramatic interior has a pavement of marble mosaics — the work of masters of the fifteenth century depicting scenes from the Old Testament.

Siena is famous for its confectionaries that include Ricciarelli biscuits, gingerbread and delicious sweets made of honey and almonds. However,  a day cannot go by in Italy without a gelato. You must make a trip to GROM. This is a unique gelato experience. They make gelato and sorbet the old-fashioned way with real seasonal ingredients and methods that are reflected in the quality and taste of their gelato. Here are some of their exciting flavours…

• Caramello al sale
• Cassata siciliana
• Liquirizia
• Marron Glacé
• Tiramisù
• Zabaione

Interested in painting? Visit http://patfiorello.com/
More info on San Fedele – info@borgosanfedele.com http://www.borgosanfedele.com/en/history.htm
Need a holiday https://www.ilchiostro.com/

Next blog I will be in Roma… stand by for some food, fun and fantastic sites….

Categories: Food, Wine and Cooking, Italy, Language, Photography, Recipes, Travel, Uncategorized, Wine | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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