Italy and La Bella Lingua – Who gives a fig?

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I am enjoying attending the Italian language school in Orvieto. Some days I feel I am making progress, then the black hand of stupidity strikes me dumb and all I can utter is complete nonsense. There are many linguistic pitfalls to avoid, such as, “la fica” is the singular for Fig Tree. However, the fruit is referred to in the plural as “le fiche” because the singular of fig is “fica” and colloquially means vagina (or worse in slang!!). So one has to be careful when buying figs in the fruit shop and not order 500gms of vagina!! However, the Italians have solved this confusion – when ordering figs they only use the plural – “le fiche”

Language can be a tricky beast. I was in a small restaurant in Orvieto and there was a young couple beside me who ordered tiramisu for desert. The plate arrived and it was a pool of creamy mascarpone flavoured with marsala and coffee. Sitting slightly submerged in this yummy pool of deliciousness were several lady finger biscuits which are traditionally used as the back bone of tiramasu. In the kitchen of trendy restaurants around the world the parlance to describe this on the menu would be a “deconstructed tiramisu”. However, the young man from an unknown European country, described his tiramisu as “decomposed”.

Many menus can make interesting reading – for instance:
• umbrichelli all’ortolana – local translation was “a home-made umbrichelli with a sauce of farmers juice”
• gnocchi con il sugo di pecorino – English explanation – home-made dumplings with a ragu of ship.  I am sure the writer meant “sheep”.

In addition to attending language school – I have undertaken to improve my photography skills. And so, I hooked up with a professional photographer living in Orvieto. Patrick Nicholas, originally from Oxford, England came to Italy in the early 80’s where he was a fashion photographer in Milan for some years before striking out and doing his own artistic thing.

My photographic tuition saw us making a number of excursions to  nearby towns in Umbria and Tuscany taking in the surrounding countryside. Patrick has been instructing me in the use of the digital SLR camera using only the manual settings. Not only was Patrick an expert in photography I enjoyed his company and insights of living and working in Italy for many years. So now I know (well sort of), the intricacies of shutter speed, F stops, ISO settings and many other mechanical things but also to focal length, light, time of day, the subject and context etc. So much to think about and get right before you can even press the button. The photos in the above slide show are a selection from our days together.

Sunday is a very important day for most families in Italy. It is a time to get together and enjoy a good meal, lots of chatter and of course enjoy the local vino. My Sunday lunch was a rave at Ristorante Antico Bucchero. This place has been in operation since 1989. The appetizer of very thin strips of smoked duck breast on a salad of radicchio with walnuts dressed with a sweet vinaigrette – delicious and a real winner. Secondo was vitello tonato – this is a cold dish of thin slices of poached or roasted nut of veal laid out over the plate and then a rich creamy sauce of blended tuna, capers, anchovies and garlic bound together in a rich egg mayonnaise and dotted with capers is spread liberally over the top. To accompany this, I selected a contorni (side dish of vegetables) of spinachi drizzled with olive oil with a hint of chillies which added that extra zing. Fantastic! No dolce today – even though the torrone nougat cream – a googy confection of cream, honey and almonds was tempting and of course the home-made chocolate gelato had me thinking but the fromaggio misto won the day.

The plate included – Caciotta an artisan, semi-soft, cheese made from about 70% ewes’ and 30% cows’ milk and has a firm, creamy consistency, and has a full flavour that ranges from mild to tangy. Of course every cheese plate within a radius of a few hundred kilometres will have some type of Pecorino on it. This cheese was a favourite of Lorenzo il Magnifico – that great renaissance Medici ruler. Pecorino is a cooked-milk cheese made with whole, raw milk from sheep. The wheels of cheese mature in very humid cellars and periodically their walnut leaf-wrapped rinds are damped first with olive oil, then with grease and wax. The big flavour on the plate was Gorganzola Dolce. Dolcelatte was developed for the British market to provide a milder smelling and tasting alternative to the famous traditional Italian blue cheese, Gorgonzola. It is sometimes referred to as Gorgonzola Dolce. The production method for dolcelatte is similar to the methods used to make Gorgonzola. One difference is that it is made from the curd of only one milking. It takes about two to three months to produce and age this cheese. The fat content of dolcelatte is higher than Gorgonzola at about 50%. That is why we like it – that rich creamy texture and the sharp tang of the blue coming through. Finally the fourth cheese on the plate was an aged parmesan – sharp, crumbly and salty. The plate was simply presented with a few walnuts and a small dish of lightly flavoured and crystal clear honey. Marvellous!

Categories: Food, Wine and Cooking, Italy, Language, Photography, Travel, Wine | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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3 thoughts on “Italy and La Bella Lingua – Who gives a fig?

  1. Stephen

    Absolutely love this. When can we meet up in Orvieto and visit Ristorante Antico Bucchero. Will be very careful when I am ordering figs next time in Italia. The other one to watch out for is il tetto or i tetti. You say la tetta or le tette and all of a sudden with the later you have the roof covered with tits. Can be difficult to walk on also but ask the roofing man he may know better.
    Your photography is inspired.
    Stephen

  2. KateD

    I WANT CHEESE NOW!!!!!!!

  3. KateD

    Duly shared on Facebook xx

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